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Yaru Wu - Les bilingues mandarin-français entendent-ils le mandarin lors de la lecture de mots du français ? Étude électroencéphalographique des interférences lexicales entre français et mandarin
Mardi 11 Février 2020, 10:00 - 12:00
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Titre de la présentation :
 
Les bilingues mandarin-français entendent-ils le mandarin lors de la lecture de mots du français ? Étude électroencéphalographique des interférences lexicales entre français et mandarin
 
Titre en anglais :
Do Mandarin-French bilinguals hear Chinese when reading French? ERP evidence of proficiency level
 
Abstract :
The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that processing a second language (L2) activates the sound, but not the spelling, of native language translations (Wu & Thierry, 2010). For this purpose, event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were recorded while native speakers of Mandarin heard or read pairs of words in their L2 (French). Participants were asked to assess whether the word pairs were semantically related or not. Critically, half of the non-related pairs had Mandarin translation equivalents that presented either a) phonological overlap or b) orthographic overlap. This interference is attested by one behavioral marker (i.e., percentage of error) and one electroencephalographical marker (the lexical N400 effect). Preliminary behavioral data show that the bilinguals made more errors for only the pairs presenting a spelling link in Mandarin translation equivalents. This result suggests that lexical activation of L2 words might be influenced by orthographic representations from the L1 lexicon. Moreover, the ERP data suggest that both phonological and spelling links in Mandarin may cause interference in processing of French pairs, as suggested by the N400 effect. Further statistical analyses will allow us to determine which linguistic (i.e., proficiency in the L2, language dominance, L2 frequency of use) and extra-linguistic factors (i.e., selective attention, interference control) may be the best predictor of the variation of the inter-lingual interferences. Taken together, the present findings contribute to precise the modeling of how co-activated languages may interact in real time while processing a second language.  
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